We Must Ignite This Couch Message Boards

(1) 2 »

 
US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
4/5/2008 11:37 am
From Madison, AL
Posts: 8384
Why y'all ain't discussing it? Everybody just holding their breath and waiting?

Posted on: 6/11 9:42 pm
_________________
Thanks goodness we have beer. I've watched WVU football for over 40 years. The only thing that surprises me is a win.
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
6/26/2010 9:15 am
Posts: 2387
they are waiting for the deep state parroting effect.

Posted on: 6/12 10:54 am
_________________
montani semper liberi & est ratio liberalismi aegritudinis animi
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/8/2008 8:36 pm
From Around
Posts: 8283
Trump is kicking ass, as he did in the G7, and his entire presidency. NK to denuclearize. Thanks President Trump.

Posted on: 6/12 11:25 am
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
9/18/2011 10:04 pm
From Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1423
He got the remains of soldiers from the Korean war back ... or as CNN will report it "Trump disrupts the burial site of US Heroes just for fun".

In all seriousness, no one really knows right now. Cautiously optimistic that this will resolve one of the major international threats right now. I think we just need to wait and see what Kim actually does. Too soon to say anything definitively.

Posted on: 6/12 3:55 pm
_________________
Dana for President
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
4/5/2008 11:37 am
From Madison, AL
Posts: 8384

Posted on: 6/12 9:11 pm
_________________
Thanks goodness we have beer. I've watched WVU football for over 40 years. The only thing that surprises me is a win.
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
8/21/2013 9:51 pm
From Madhattan
Posts: 1519

Posted on: 6/12 9:32 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
8/21/2013 9:51 pm
From Madhattan
Posts: 1519

Posted on: 6/12 9:46 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
4/5/2008 11:37 am
From Madison, AL
Posts: 8384
Open in new window

Posted on: 6/12 10:01 pm
_________________
Thanks goodness we have beer. I've watched WVU football for over 40 years. The only thing that surprises me is a win.
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
8/21/2013 9:51 pm
From Madhattan
Posts: 1519
Cute dog. Try reading the articles & see if you’re still so bored,

Posted on: 6/12 10:21 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
9/18/2011 10:04 pm
From Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1423
Yup ... Slate is the pinnacle of knowledge on foreign diplomacy. In between articles on transracial sharks and the benefits pedophilia they published this gem.

He talks tough - He's starting war.
He meets and tries to make peace - He's too soft.

The guy could literally walk on water, and the headlines would be that he cant swim.

Getting a denuclearized NK will do more to open the possibility of actually freeing and improving the lives of the NK people than merely saying, rocket man is a fat, piece of ****, who is killing his own people could ever do.

Let's just wait and see what happens. If this deal works, I could care less how many times he said Un is smart, skinny, big dicked, w/e.

I honestly do not know how some people can still be in a constant state of "the sky is falling". It must be exhausting.


Posted on: 6/13 1:26 am
_________________
Dana for President
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Makin' it Rain
Joined:
3/24/2008 7:05 pm
From Here
Posts: 3438
Wow, what great sources you link hilly. I put Slate right up there with HuffPost, Newsweek, and Cosmo, those sources that Yahoo loves so much.

Posted on: 6/13 11:43 am
_________________
Montani Semper Liberi
Open in new window


Scientists discover, understand and inform.

Environmentalists preach.
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/8/2008 8:36 pm
From Around
Posts: 8283
NK to denuclearize. But the left hates world peace for some reason. Simply because Trump is the one to achieve it. And they cant take it. It's delicious.

Posted on: 6/13 7:04 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Pitt Hater
Joined:
8/21/2013 9:51 pm
From Madhattan
Posts: 1519
Quote:

wvufan1818 wrote:
NK to denuclearize. But the left hates world peace for some reason. Simply because Trump is the one to achieve it. And they cant take it. It's delicious.


Please take a look at how many previous tines NK has made similar promises & delivered nothing. Yrr boy Donnie T is being played like a fiddle. Watch & see.

Posted on: 6/13 8:19 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
4/5/2008 11:37 am
From Madison, AL
Posts: 8384
Quote:

hill_William wrote:
Cute dog. Try reading the articles & see if you’re still so bored,


Oh I read the articles. Earth shattering. Totally surprised.

yawn

Posted on: 6/13 9:35 pm
_________________
Thanks goodness we have beer. I've watched WVU football for over 40 years. The only thing that surprises me is a win.
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/8/2008 8:36 pm
From Around
Posts: 8283
Quote:

Proud2BanEer wrote:
Quote:

hill_William wrote:
Cute dog. Try reading the articles & see if you’re still so bored,


Oh I read the articles. Earth shattering. Totally surprised.

yawn


"News agency who had Hillary Clinton in their pocket doesnt like Trump"

Riveting, Hill. Groundbreaking, actually.

Posted on: 6/14 7:00 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/8/2008 8:36 pm
From Around
Posts: 8283
Quote:

hill_William wrote:
Quote:

wvufan1818 wrote:
NK to denuclearize. But the left hates world peace for some reason. Simply because Trump is the one to achieve it. And they cant take it. It's delicious.


Please take a look at how many previous tines NK has made similar promises & delivered nothing. Yrr boy Donnie T is being played like a fiddle. Watch & see.


LOL drinking to get your mind off how terrible every liberal after JFK has been? That all of them combined are worse than a businessman/TV personality that took up politics as a hobby and destroyed two political dynasty families?

Posted on: 6/14 7:01 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/20/2008 1:23 pm
From Just barely outside the Beltway.
Posts: 7678
My take, we will have to wait and see, however, if the well-established pattern NK follows in these situations holds true, Trump got P0wn3d!

Posted on: 6/21 11:21 am
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/20/2008 1:23 pm
From Just barely outside the Beltway.
Posts: 7678
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/north-kor ... r-research-center-n887056


WASHINGTON — North Korea continues to make improvements to a major nuclear facility, raising questions about President Donald Trump's claim that Kim Jong Un has agreed to disarm, independent experts tell NBC News.

New satellite images made public by 38north, a web site devoted to analyzing North Korea, show that "improvements to the infrastructure at North Korea's Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center are continuing at a rapid pace," three 38north analysts concluded in a paper.

An annotated satellite image shows what the web site 38north says is pipeline connecting new buildings and main production building recently completed at the Radioisotope Production Facility.Airbus Defense and Space and 38 North
The analysts cautioned that the continued work at the Yongbyon facility "should not be seen as having any relationship to North Korea's pledge to denuclearize. The North's nuclear cadre can be expected to proceed with business as usual until specific orders are issued from Pyongyang."

However, other experts argue that ongoing work on the site of a reactor that is producing fuel for nuclear weapons shows that North Korea has no intention of disarming.

North Korea's Yongbyon nuclear complex before its cooling tower was demolished on June 27, 2008.Kyodo
"North Korea is continuing to expand its facilities to produce nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles," said Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. "We have never had a deal. The North Koreans never offered to give up their nuclear weapons. Never. Not once."

James Acton, co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, added, "If they were serious about unilaterally disarming, of course they would have stopped work at Yongbyon. There is a huge gulf between what the administration apparently thinks North Korea is going to do and what they intend to do, and that's exceptionally dangerous."

He added, "The Trump administration is lying to itself and to the American people."

A spokesman for the White House National Security Council did not respond to a request for comment. Spokesmen for the Director of National Intelligence and the CIA declined to comment.

Allison Puccioni, an imagery analyst at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation and an expert on the Yongbyon facility, said it was unrealistic at this point to expect North Korea to have stopped working on the reactor complex.

"Just because they blew up one or two tunnels at a nuclear test site doesn't mean they are going to stop working on a reactor that they are telling everybody that they are using for electricity," she said.

Joel Wit, a senior fellow at the Stimson Center and the founder of 38north, agreed.

"What you have is a commitment to denuclearize — we don't have the deal yet, we just have a general commitment. So I don't find it surprising at all" that work at Yongbyon continues.

North Korea has increased nuclear production at secret sites, say U.S. officials


But Wit added that he thought Trump had "oversold" the idea that North Korea would soon denuclearize.

The gulf between rhetoric and reality is "exceptionally dangerous," Acton said, because "sooner or later…I think Trump is going to feel he has egg on his face. I worry deeply he'll start lashing out like he did last summer."

After their Singapore summit, Trump and Kim issued a joint statement agreeing to "work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula."

The document, less than 400 words, offered almost no details about how or when that would happen.

Asked a few days later whether North Korea's denuclearization would be "verifiable and irreversible" — given that those words are not in the declaration, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo responded that he found the question "insulting and ridiculous and, frankly, ludicrous. I just have to be honest with you. It's a game and one ought not play games with serious matters like this."


He added, "The modalities are beginning to develop. There'll be a great deal of work to do. It's — there's a long way to go, there's much to think about, but don't say silly things."

At a June 20 rally in Duluth, Minnesota, Trump defended his decision to meet with Kim, bragging that he extracted a major concession from the dictator: "Sentence one says 'a total denuclearization of North Korea,'" Trump said. "There will be denuclearization. So that's the real story."

It's not clear from the satellite imagery to what extent the Yongbyon reactor is operating, the 38north report said, but it concluded that uranium enrichment appears to be in progress. Wit, who negotiated a 1994 deal with North Korea, said the facility has become less important to North Korea's program, and currently produces enough nuclear material to build two to three bombs every two years.

In 2007, North Korea agreed to shut down the site, and in 2008 the regime blew up the main cooling tower. But after talks collapsed, North Korea in 2009 resumed the reprocessing of spent fuel to recover plutonium at the site.

In May, weeks before Trump met Kim in Singapore, North Korea appeared to destroy three nuclear tunnels, observation buildings, a metal foundry and living quarters at its Punggye-ri nuclear test. But experts said the site could easily be rebuilt.




Open in new window

Posted on: 7/4 1:44 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/20/2008 1:23 pm
From Just barely outside the Beltway.
Posts: 7678
https://www.thedailybeast.com/pompeo-h ... rump-give-away?ref=scroll


Pompeo Heads Back to North Korea. What More Will Trump Give Away?
The administration needs something to show Kim Jong Un will keep at least one of the commitments from the schmoozefest in Singapore last month. But Trump keeps paying up front.

SEOUL—Secretary of State Mike Pompeo heads back to Pyongyang on Thursday pretty sure the North Koreans will have some American soldiers’ remains to offer, if nothing else. This comes at a time when the administration needs something, anything, to show Kim Jong Un would keep at least one of the commitments from his schmoozefest with President Donald Trump in Singapore on June 12.

But nukes? Complete, verifiable, irreversible “denuclearization”—CVID, as the Americans say? We are a long, long way from that. And reports by NBC News and The Washington Post over the last few days suggest we are getting farther away all the time.

The North Koreans are not saying a thing about those intelligence assessments from Washington that purport to show they’re doing whatever they can to hide their nuclear warheads—and may even be improving on the facilities with which to make them.

Pompeo, on his third mission to North Korea, his first since the Singapore summit, will hope to meet Kim, whom he saw on his first two visits to Pyongyang. But there’s no guarantee he’ll get much more than the skeletal remains of about 200 GIs killed during the Korean War more than 65 years ago.

Trump told a rally in Duluth, Minnesota, two weeks ago the bones already had been turned over, which turned out not to be true. That was a relatively minor claim compared to his boast on June 15 when he told reporters that he’d taken care of the North Korean nuclear threat, which outgoing President Barack Obama had told him was “the most dangerous problem” he’d face. “I have solved that problem,” Trump said. “That problem is largely solved.”

Nope.

While it’s possible the North Koreans have more in mind to offer than the hostage remains of American fighting men, there’s not much reason to be optimistic about Kim’s making good on the administration’s core demand: “Complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization” and the abbreviated term CVID are not in the lexicon of the North Korean state media.


Will Trump Steal Kim Jong Un Away From China?
Pompeo in Pyongyang may also, diplomatically, avoid use of those dreaded initials, but he has said they do equate to “complete denuclearization,” and he’s going there to persuade the North Koreans to try and give an appearance of the “progress” that White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said was happening when she announced his mission.

The point, she said, was to keep up the “great momentum” for “a positive change”—favorite White House phrases—although aside from the talk about return of remains there’s been no public indication of any such momentum since Trump and Kim signed that joint statement in Singapore.

Victor Cha, White House adviser on Korea during the presidency of George W. Bush and now a professor at Georgetown, told me in an email that there is “pressure” to add substance to those denuclearization promises in return for Trump’s unilateral cancellation of huge annual U.S.-South Korean war games set for August. But he is skeptical about the likelihood of any great news about nukes in the short term.

“The intelligence community is leaking that North Korea is amassing nuclear fuel. No one said this was going to be easy!”
— Victor Cha, former George W. Bush advisor on Korea
Formerly Trump’s choice as ambassador to South Korea, Cha lost out last year after making clear he did not favor a “preemptive strike” on North Korea. Nor was he on board with Trumpian threats to pour “fire and fury” on the North if Kim, then reviled by Trump as “Little Rocket Man,” persisted in threats to launch a nuclear warhead at the U.S.

Now Cha appears as a hard-nosed realist noting the obstacles likely to preclude Kim behaving like the “honorable” nice guy who “loves his people” portrayed by Trump post-summit. “The intelligence community is leaking that North Korea is amassing nuclear fuel,” Cha told me. “No one said this was going to be easy!”

As for the optimism still exuded by President Donald J. Trump, Cha said simply, “If DJT thought that a meeting and some nice words would get KJU to abandon his programs in some fairy tale ending to the Korean problematic, then he should know better now.” There are, Cha said, “no fairy-tale endings with North Korea.”

But Cha also made clear the Americans thought they had reason to expect some concessions from the North as a modicum of good faith in return for cancellation of Ulchi Freedom Guardian, the massive joint annual U.S.-South Korean military exercise that had been set as usual for August. “Otherwise,” Cha asked rhetorically, “why suspend the exercise?”

Sung Kim, a former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, has been negotiating at the truce village of Panmunjom with North Korea’s Kim Yong Chol, vice chairman of the ruling Workers’ Party, who recently met Trump and Pompeo in Washington. The overall nuclear program—and return of remains—are both believed to be on the agenda, along with those intelligence reports that the North Koreans might well be going back on the solemn pledge that Kim Jong Un made in Singapore.

First NBC News and then The Washington Post reported signs of North Korea reversing course while avoiding any reference in public statements to its nuclear program. The Post, sourcing unidentified “officials,” cited “preparations to deceive the United States about the number of nuclear warheads in North Korea’s arsenal as well as the existence of undisclosed facilities used to make fissile material for nuclear bombs….”

That report jibes with what others have been telling me about the North’s nuclear activities. Bruce Bechtol, former U.S. Defense Department intelligence analyst and author of books on North Korea’s military, said satellite imagery indicates the North’s main nuclear complex at Yongbyon, 60 miles north of Pyongyang, “remains not only operational but [Kim] has actually made some improvements to the site.” How “major or minor” they are “is up to the spin of the analyst,” said Bechtol,” but the fact remains that Yongbyon has not slowed down and is actually upgrading a bit.”

Besides Yongbyon, the site of the North’s plutonium reactor, with which it has made most of its 40 to 60 warheads, Bechtol said North Korea had at least two facilities for making them with highly enriched uranium. “Since North Korea continues to operate Yongbyon,” he said, “operations at other secret (HEU) sites would be consistent with a policy of operating their nuclear weaponization facilities even as talks continue.”

“There are no real surprises here. It is like one of my favorite Chinese phrases, which kind of translates as ‘you can't teach a dog not to eat s***.’”
— Stephen Tharp, former advisor and participant North Korea talks
Joseph Yun, recently retired as the State Department’s top expert and negotiator on North Korea, said in a visit here last week that “what we’re looking for is a sign that Kim is serious about changing the course.” As a first step, he said, “they have to give a complete declaration of what they have.” Only with that declaration “will we know that they are serious.”

Yun estimated for the North to get rid of its entire program “might take 15 or 20 years” though he did “have expectations” that “the two sides will agree on concrete measures” while Pompeo is in Pyongyang.

Choi Jin-wook, former head of the Korea Institute of National Unification, believes the whole process “is going to be several years if at all.” While “there is no CVID,” he said the search for the missing American dead can be “big business for North Korea, “coming eventually to more than $100 million.”

Maybe Kim can take some much publicized steps to save face for Trump, like returning skeletal remains, but there’s also that difficult thing called “sequencing.” The Americans have indicated they seriously expect a specific schedule. They’re avoiding all those intimidating “line” words — like “timeline” or “deadline” or the really awful “red line,” but they want details, details. But any precise promise or commitment may be elusive.

Kim no doubt is happy to have been treated as a statesman-like “equal” to the American president, and cancellation of the hated war games was all well and good, but he definitely wants more—much more, starting with relief from sanctions imposed by the U.N. and U.S. after all those nuclear tests, most recently last September.

China is winking at some of the sanctions as oil and other much needed products flow across the border, but Trump and Pompeo have both said forget about removing sanctions if you don’t do away with your nuclear program, as The Daily Beast has reported. That was a major point in Trump’s rambling press conference after the Singapore summit.

Trump was careful enough to fudge on whether the North needed “a 15-year process” to cease to be a nuclear state. “Assuming you wanted to do it quickly, I don’t believe that,” he said. “I think whoever wrote that is wrong. There will be a point at which when you are 20 percent through you can’t go back.”

For evidence, he cited conversations with “an uncle who was a great professor for 40 years at MIT.” Yup, turns out Trump “used to discuss nukes with him all the time.” John Trump “was a great expert, a great brilliant genius,” said the adoring nephew. “MIT sent me a book on my uncle. We used to talk about nuclear. You talk about a complex subject. It is not just get rid of the—rid of the nukes. When you hit a certain point, you cannot go back.”

But how long, then, would North Korea need before reaching that nebulous point-of-no-return? “We don’t know,” Trump hedged, “but it will be quickly.” Presumably those remarks leave room for negotiations—maybe even beginning to lift sanctions—for Pompeo to talk about in Pyongyang.

Analysts are fairly unanimous, however, in deriding National Security Adviser John Bolton’s hypothetical and hyperbolic remark Sunday on CBS’ Face the Nation that U.S. experts, “with North Korean cooperation, with full disclosure of all of their chemical and biological, nuclear programs, ballistic missile sites... would be able to dismantle the overwhelming bulk of their programs within a year.”

Bolton said he was sure that Pompeo would be talking to the North Koreans about “how to dismantle all of their WMD and ballistic missile programs”—and, “if they have already made the strategic decision to do that and they’re cooperative, we can move very quickly.”

Kim Kisam, a former South Korean intelligence official now in the U.S., says flatly that U.S. overtures to North Korea “cannot go well.” Both the U.S. and North Korea “want to buy as much time as possible,” he said. “They share that interest. No more than that.” He predicted a “showdown maybe at the end of this year or beginning of next year.”

“Those who trust North Korea pay a dear price,” said commentator Shim Jae-hoon, a longtime writer for the old Far Eastern Economic Review and contributor to Yale Global. The Singapore summit “had the effect of establishing North Korea as a ninth nuclear state,” he told me. “Trump got nothing for his avowed aim of denuclearizing the North. Now the U.S. and South Korea are going to pay a stiff price for his diplomatic fiasco.”

Stephen Tharp, a retired U.S. Army officer who spent most of his career advising and participating in talks with the North Koreans at Panmunjom, put it this way: “There are no real surprises here. It is like one of my favorite Chinese phrases, which kind of translates as ‘you can’t teach a dog not to eat ****.’”

That’s a view that Pompeo would hope not to reconfirm during his upcoming visit to Pyongyang. If he just gets the North Koreans to agree to turn over some of those remains, then he and Trump may think they can still go around saying the mission was a “terrific” if not “amazing” success on the way to CVID, no, make that “denuclearization.”

Posted on: 7/4 1:47 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 


 
Re: US / NK Summit
Gettin' Schmitty
Joined:
7/20/2008 1:23 pm
From Just barely outside the Beltway.
Posts: 7678
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/de ... on&utm_term=.37676fca6f84


Do they give out Nobel Peace Prizes for praising and appeasing brutal dictators who threaten nuclear war — without getting anything in return?

President Trump claimed he would use his world-class dealmaking skills to convince North Korea’s dictator, Kim Jong Un, to surrender his nuclear weapons. Instead, Trump got played. Kim, who pledged in wishy-washy language to “denuclearize,” is now accelerating his nuclear program. The nuclear threat from North Korea — and the risk of a preemptive war launched by Trump — are both growing. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is heading to North Korea this week hoping to contain the fallout.

Twenty days ago, Trump shook hands with Kim in Singapore. At the summit, Trump played the role of apologist in chief for Kim’s human rights abuses while praising Kim as a “very talented” person because he can “run it tough.” In North Korea, “running it tough” means executing dissidents, torturing political prisoners in gulags and threatening to wipe a few U.S. cities off the map with a nuclear blast.

The White House and Trump’s surrogates insisted that the unsavory handshake would be vindicated. They claimed we were witnessing a history-making deal from a history-making dealmaker. Former presidents, guided by experts who understood every intricacy of North Korean politics, had failed. All it would take from Trump, they claimed, was a one-on-one handshake, a photo-op and some touting of North Korea’s prospects for developing beachfront resorts. Hit by that sophisticated diplomatic approach, Kim would trade missiles for condos. Then, the president’s cheerleaders argued, Trump could accept his well-deserved invitation to Oslo.

It was risible then. Now it is being revealed as fatally naive.

Sunday, the Wall Street Journal reported that North Korea is rapidly completing a major expansion of a key manufacturing facility for missiles — missiles that can strike American allies, American military bases in those allied countries and, yes, the mainland United States.

North Korea watchers also used recent satellite images to conclude that “improvements to the infrastructure at North Korea’s Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center are continuing at a rapid pace.”

NBC News and The Post also reported this weekend that “U.S. intelligence agencies believe that North Korea has increased its production of fuel for nuclear weapons at multiple secret sites in recent months.”

To anyone with even a basic understanding of North Korea, this comes as no surprise. “The [North Koreans’] insistence on vague language in the Singapore declaration was almost certainly so that they could continue accelerated development of nuclear facilities,” Robert E. Kelly, professor of political science at Pusan National University, told me on Monday. “It is a mark of how poorly President Trump prepared for Singapore that he did not anticipate this and demand sharper language and a timeline in exchange for the valuable concession of a presidential summit.”

It is becoming alarmingly clear that Trump’s “win” was a major loss for international security. But it is also a major loss for those who believe in using diplomacy rather than war to neutralize the North Korean nuclear threat.

Perhaps that’s by design. John Bolton, Trump’s national security adviser, has long argued (before his current stint in the White House) that the United States should preemptively attack North Korea. In February, he wrote a Wall Street Journal op-ed, providing the legal justification for preemptive strikes to topple Kim’s regime and take out their nuclear program — a strategy that most analysts agree could lead to hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of deaths.

In March, Bolton argued on Fox News that a Trump-Kim summit would be a positive development because it would “foreshorten the amount of time that we’re going to waste on negotiations.” In Bolton’s view, meeting with Kim would expose the North Korean regime as untrustworthy scoundrels who could not be swayed by diplomatic olive branches. Once president-to-chairman diplomacy inevitably failed, it would pave the way for Bolton’s favored choice: deadly force.

Trump hired Bolton as his new national security adviser exactly one month after that interview.

Bolton may soon be proved right that the time on negotiations was “wasted” — not because diplomacy is doomed to fail, but because the amateur and childishly naive approach that Trump took was always doomed to fail.

As Kim marches closer to his dynasty’s long-standing dream of having an arsenal of nuclear weapons that can reliably hit U.S. cities within an hour, Trump looks like a gullible fool. And while he decides how to respond to being duped, Trump will have a mustachioed warmonger whispering in his ear, a man who has already told the world that he wants diplomacy to fail because it will lead to war.

There is still the possibility that real progress can be made if Trump stays out of the spotlight and lets the real diplomatic work get done behind the scenes. But if you believe Trump’s tweet that “There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea” or that there is “no longer” the risk of war with North Korea, then you, I’m sorry to say, are also a gullible fool.

Posted on: 7/4 1:50 pm
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer
 



(1) 2 »




Login
Username:

Password:

remember me





Copyright © 2004-2011 wemustignitethiscouch.com All Rights Reserved